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E itibaren Uelversheim, Almanya itibaren Uelversheim, Almanya

Okuyucu E itibaren Uelversheim, Almanya

E itibaren Uelversheim, Almanya

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This is a slim volume -- only about 150 pages, which rather surprised me. I expected it to be longer and, truth be told, much better than it was. It is pretty much just porn, and not even very well written porn. I was hoping the author would discuss more of how she lead this "double life" (which she did touch on a little) and how she justified it, especially considering some of her clients were married men. I suppose I was hoping for a little remorse, a little guilt, something to acknowledge that she was enabling these men to cheat on their wives and that she, herself, was cheating on her boyfriends. There is none of that in the book at all. At times she bemoans the fact that she can't have a more emotional relationship with her clients, at others she seems to rejoice in the freedom she has with them. I suppose she could feel both ways at the same time, but it seems to me as if she was still wrestling with some bigger issues. I suppose I was also hoping to read something about her that would endear me to her, make her a person I may geuinely like outside of her chose profession. The lack of guilt or remorse put me off, but I was more affected by her responses to what were very fair accusations placed by the men she was dating at the time. She cames across at outrageously angry when accused by boyfriends of "acting like a whore in bed" and "being materialistic". She herself admitted that she had become freer sexually after turning tricks - maybe her boyfriend didn't put it as tactfully as she would have liked, but it was a truthful statement. As for the materialistic side, she admitted that she wasn't satisifed in her relationship with a man because he was "poor" and they argued over going to expensive places, etc. Her indignation at having a spade called a spade aggrivated me. Overall, it's hard to say what I thought of the book. Not what I expected, that's for sure. Since this book was originally published in the '80s, it would be interesting to read where she is now.

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I really enjoyed this book. I've had it a while and it just sat in my digital TBR pile for a couple years. I don't know why I kept putting it off. I loved Barrons and the world-building. I liked Mac. All her descriptions of nail polish, clothes, and decor were tiring after a while. I wanted to skim over them, but pushed through. She grew on me tho. I hardly liked her at all at the beginning, but by the end she had grown on me. I liked the story style. Mac is telling us the story after it already happened, not as she goes. We get some glimpses into future events and into her hindsight as it unfolds, but it is mostly spoiler free on the future stuff. She had a lot of growing to do in this installment. She's a lot tougher and braver than at the beginning, but she is still grieving and still trying to come to terms with some things that she discovers. Barrons seems to have evolved too. When they first meet, he is rough with her, and later in the book we see a softer side to him. I said softer, not soft. He doesn't coddle her. I like that he doesn't baby sit her every step of the way. Mac is very independent of mind, even when circumstances dictate she should seek help. I dId expect more sex and got none. Since I'm coming to this series late, I've heard a lot about Barrons and Mac and expected more of a romance. There's hints it could go that way, and it's refreshing to be away from that "inta-love" that's in so many other books. I'm enjoying the "slow burn" romance...if it even is a romance.

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Transporting the young reader to seventeenth century America, Witch Child is a purported diary of Mary Nuttall, a teenage girl eventually suspected of being a witch. It begins in England, where Mary’s grandmother is tortured, tried and hung for what others believe is witchcraft. A protector sends Mary across the sea to live in a Puritan settlement and escape persecution. She assists Martha in medicine, gathering herbs and helping people heal and attending to women in labor. Eventually she befriends a Native American boy, Jaybird, who teaches her about the usefulness of the forest and the healing powers of some of the plants. Mary draws the scorn of Reverend Johnson when she keeps Rebekah from marrying him after his wife dies during childbirth, and when whispers of witchcraft make their way to the small town, Mary finds herself at the center of controversy. Before the town rises up against her, she disappears into the forest with the help of Jaybird. Is she a witch? Though the book leaves room for doubt, Mary does have extra-sensory powers. When a child gets lost, she uses her “vision” to help locate the missing boy. She senses the presence of her late grandmother. In general, Mary is an independent, strong-willed young woman whose very being conflicts with the patriarchal society present. The trial scenes are straight out of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, complete with girls feigning illness in order to avoid getting in trouble themselves. Witch Child is mostly historic fiction, but it does invoke fantastic elements. One certainly has a sense that Mary has some sort of power during her “vision” episode, and as times the spirits color the background. For the most part, author Celia Rees succeeds in creating New England circa the latter 1600s, and she ties the book to the present with a prologue that suggests the diary was found in the lining of a quilt that was passed down through several generations. It is thought-provoking read that young readers will enjoy, especially middle and high school girls.