erandesilva

Eran Desilva Desilva itibaren La Maza, Cantabria, İspanya itibaren La Maza, Cantabria, İspanya

Okuyucu Eran Desilva Desilva itibaren La Maza, Cantabria, İspanya

Eran Desilva Desilva itibaren La Maza, Cantabria, İspanya

erandesilva

Küçük çocuklar için kapsayıcı tema ile temel, basit fikirler ... her zaman son ürün değil, sanat süreci. AŞK!

erandesilva

ne diyebilirim, ben klasik bir inekim.

erandesilva

What a fun, smart book! Not only does McGuire spin a great story that's fun to read and interesting to follow, but he raises important questions that border on political and philisophical. Worth reading.

erandesilva

Wonderful historical fiction, with some slight elements of pagan mysticism. Northwest Europe, circa ninth century, is in upheaval, both political and religious. Corban Loosestrife, the hero of the preceding novel 'The Soul Thief', has tried to abandon the uncertainty and bloodshed of Europe by moving to the New World, where he and his wife, sister, and four children occupy a small coastal island. Corban has a tenuous but peaceful relationship with the neighboring indigenous tribe. In the late spring, Ulf arrives with Corban's sister-in-law, Arre, and Arre's husband Euan, who has become a successful merchant back in Jorvik (York, England). When a warlike native tribe from the West comes to terrorize Corban's family and neighbors, Corban realizes that he has brought with him to the New World a sinister blood omen, which can be lifted only by returning to Denmark and tying up the loose ends he had left fifteen years earlier. He sets out to Europe with his son Conn and Mav's son, Raef. Quickly, they are tied up in the political and tactical intrigue of the kings and bishops of England, Norway, Denmark, and even Germany. Corban's name has become something of legend in the time that he has been gone. He is regarded as a powerful wizard, and as such he is treated as a commodity, looked upon with both awe and suspicion. Meanwhile, Conn and Raef join a fledgling company led by Sweyn, a young man who claims to be the son of the king. Conn and Raef both adjust from life on the small coastal island to continental life, along with all the threats and opportunities entailed by life in the city and in war. This is a thoroughly enjoyable read; however, you must be open (as I am) to slight elements of mysticism in your historical fiction. (Who is to say that pagan magic didn't die out with the spread of Christianity across north Europe?) I suppose that my only gripe is that after the first Act, the events of the novel never return to the island in the New World. However, it is possible that this strand will be tied up in the next novel of the series, 'The Serpent Dreamer'. On a side note, I charitably assume that Ms. Holland was not the one to sign off on the novel's cover art. I believe that Viking helmets did not actually have horns on them; that is a fictional convention which arose in opera.