danitelck

Daniela Telck Telck itibaren Boca del Monte, Ver., Meksika itibaren Boca del Monte, Ver., Meksika

Okuyucu Daniela Telck Telck itibaren Boca del Monte, Ver., Meksika

Daniela Telck Telck itibaren Boca del Monte, Ver., Meksika

danitelck

Based on the film, I thought this book would be a run-of-the-mill post-apocalyptic action romp, one that I would enjoy as a quick read but not need to keep. I was wrong on almost every count. First, the language is stunning, and quite frankly caught me completely by surprise. And the protagonist, Theo Faron, is not a man of action, but a man of reflection, an Oxford professor of history who lives alone with his books and his guilty memories. The action aspects of the plot are slow in developing (though not in a bad way), delayed and interrupted by Theo's journal entries recalling his past and reflecting on a present that has no future: humans have become infertile, and the last of the children have recently passed into adulthood. England is now under the control of the Warden - Theo's cousin - who has mostly benevolent intentions but never hesitates to do what is "necessary" to retain his power and give the populace what they want: comfort and safety as they wait for the end.