allanahdeluca

Allanah Deluca Deluca itibaren Kopytówka, Polonya itibaren Kopytówka, Polonya

Okuyucu Allanah Deluca Deluca itibaren Kopytówka, Polonya

Allanah Deluca Deluca itibaren Kopytówka, Polonya

allanahdeluca

A couple of years ago, I was blown by a German boytoy. By “I,” of course, I mean “my mind,” and by “German boytoy,” I mean Herman Hesse. I was reading a book called Steppenwolf, in which a relatively ordinary man, Harry Haller, grows to believe that his body harbors two distinct personalities: his own mundane self and another that is based and animalistic. As the novel progresses, Haller is subjected to a number of strange and surreal situations that lead him to question his identity. Rico Slade Will Fucking Kill You, I think, does something very similar. However, rather than restricting such an outlandish course of events as Hesse does, Sands extends the satirical philosophy to our society at large. Stick with me here. Rico Slade is about an action movie actor who loses his grip on reality and starts believing that he is his character. He is constantly blowing things up, fighting people, and trying to destroy his arch nemesis. It’s fairly easy to sit back and giggle quietly to yourself while you watch his insane antics. But, as I see it, if you’re brain works, you won’t be doing that for long. The events in Rico Slade are every bit as surreal as those in Steppenwolf, only we don’t really recognize them as such. Just below the surface, we see that Sands is saying something about the acclimation our culture has experienced where the fantastic is concerned. It’s not completely unreasonable to think Rico Slade might, in real life, tear someone’s throat out. It’s become pretty goddamned realistic to go into a battle with a gang of cops. It is, I think, much easier to go the route bizarro typically takes and draw out the surreal through the exploitation of Seussian juxtapositions. In this one, however, Sands is using our present day existence as the fantastic setting for his surprisingly normal characters. He’s doing what Huxley did with Brave New World, only he isn’t laying down prophecy; he’s watching you live and is taking notes. As a culture, we idolize people. We love our celebrities so much that we elect them into office. We let these professional fakers run our country. Am I wrong, or does that say something? Chip Johnson, Rico Slade’s real-life persona, has a breakdown and resorts to becoming the person he pretends to be. Suddenly, he sees himself worthy of respect and admiration. He becomes his own man by embracing a cultural cliché. He highlights the dual personalities existing inside of Chip and allows them to fragment in the same way Hesse does with Haller. The key difference there is that Haller achieves something as result of this fragmentation. Does Chip? Or is Sands merely pointing out the absurdity of our lives? Is our search for meaning in this world we’ve crafted out of celebrities and psychoanalysis and really big explosions worth living? Does life have a point if we’re living it as Chip Johnson? Or does it only begin to approach meaning when we forge ourselves into the overwhelmingly unreal action hero? No matter what the answer is, I want to fucking kill you. And Rico Slade will fucking kill you. Put that in your existentialist pipe and go fuck yourself with it.

allanahdeluca

This was a cute read. My problem was with the plot. How can a parent send a daughter to brat camp or even worse military camp over trouble with boys. Its seem to me the dad didn't care enough for his daughter to do anything. He allowed the stepmother to make all the decisions and of course she just sent her away. I like the plot better when the reader got to the camp. We saw Shelby grow in who she is. She was able to open up over matters that were bothering her. The wolf part was good. I like the twist of the story and how is all played out. The both of them got along well and had similar past. They were there for each other and understood each other very well. They did not allow anything get in between them. I like how the leaned on each other for anything. The trust with them built up was good and true. My only gripe was the parent situation. I wish the father would be more understanding and loving to his daughter instead of letting someone else do it. It's not no wonder she had major trust issues. Over all it is a good book.